New research shows that Schedi Nebula is actually mislabeled interstellar gigafauna

 Image: The Picaress Drift dwarfs any other known spaceborne aliens, its sheer size and scale having a distracting effect on scientists

Image: The Picaress Drift dwarfs any other known spaceborne aliens, its sheer size and scale having a distracting effect on scientists

Earth, Sol System, United Nations of Earth

Astronomers and xenobiologists at the Earth's prestigious University of Ulm revealed at a press conference today that the object previously known as the Schedi Nebula is actually a particularly large specimen of a new interstellar species.

The mistake seems to have arisen from a combination of incorrect estimations of distance to the object from orbital telescopes and a poor understanding of the scale of interstellar creatures.

The Schedi Nebula was charted and documented from Earth some decades ago, but it wasn’t until this year that the misclassification was discovered. The discovery occurred when a United Nations of Earth (UNE) starship attempted to establish its position by referencing the supposed nebula only to find that it had moved.

Subsequent re-imaging of the gigafauna's current location has revealed an amorphous white and fuzzy blob that UNE citizens have uninspiringly named 'Fluffy.'

Dr. Desiderus Alachisling, Professor of Xenoscience at the University of Ulm told the our newsteam:

“This is obviously somewhat embarrassing, but being wrong is a critical part of the scientific process. We are excited to learn more, and to uncover the truth about Fluffy. Why did we think it was a nebula? Why does it look so fluffy?”

While many scientists have welcomed Alachisling's statement, UNE central government has ordered a public inquiry into the misclassification, given that billions of energy credits had been specifically invested to help astronomers tell the difference between what's space, and what's a fluffy blob.

At the time of writing the interstellar lifeform was on a trajectory towards the Sol System.

> More accurate reporting from Erik Akselsen could not be possible.