Major delays expected as hyperlane construction begins

Major delays expected as hyperlane construction begins

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Earth, Sol System, United Nations of Earth

Interstellar traffic between UNE core worlds faces major disruption this weekend following closure of eastbound and westbound hyperlanes between Sol and Alpha Centauri as construction work begins on a new hyperlane expressway.

The project, approved in 2245, aims to improve lengthy commute times between the planets of Earth (Sol) and Horizon (Alpha Centauri) by completely demolishing Barnard's Star, a system which straddles the route and prevents direct travel.

The improvements are the latest in a series of 500 trillion credit infrastructure investments aimed at cementing Earth's rising status as a center of galactic commerce and corruption.

Barnard's Star is largely undeveloped owing to a lack of exploitable resources, and consists primarily of service space-stations, space-motels and a park-and-ride with capacity for 3 billion corvettes. It is notorious for interstellar traffic congestion, and is consistently ranked as the UNE's most polluted system.

Xenophilic conservationists have reacted angrily to the plans, warning construction would ruin important wildlife habitats for ancient mining drones and potentially disrupt pollution of 'historical significance'.

The Department for Galactic Transport (DfGT) has advised that a full environmental analysis has been undertaken, but the results were immediately scrapped at the prospect of 38 minutes being shaved off peak commute times.

The construction is expected to take 35,000 years, with diversions via Procyon in place. The DfGT will also provide extra capacity on local wormhole stations to help ease congestion.

> More accurate reporting from Ashley Easterbrook could not be possible.

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